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Blog: Living Mighty Well

Inspiring Teenager With EDS Shares What It Means to Be Truly "Mighty"

I stood in front of an audience of 50 preparing to share my story. Despite the familiar faces, I was still scared. But I became more and more confident as I kept talking. 

I have been through so much this past year. This was the first time that I truly learned the meaning of the word “mighty.”

IT MIGHT BE MIGHTY

Mighty has a different meaning to everyone. It may have a religious meaning to some people. To others, it may have a negative connotation. At first, I never truly understood it.

But now, I feel incredibly fortunate to see it in myself and others.

I see mightiness in stories published on Mighty Well’s blog, especially stories from its CEO and co-founder, Emily Levy.

I also see mightiness in every awareness video or article published about helping people with chronic illness.

FROM PAIN TO VICTORY

A year and a half ago, I had the realization of owning my story and embracing the word “mighty.” I had been fighting chronic illness. First, came the Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS), then the hemiplegic migraines, then the celiac, and finally the Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS). National Health Service describes EDS:

As a group of rare inherited conditions that affect connective tissue. Connective tissues provide support in the skin, tendons, ligaments, blood vessels, internal organs, and bones.

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Since the diagnosis, I have suffered so much. But surprisingly, I have also accomplished so much more. I wrote tons of articles about EDS, made awareness videos, participated in projects, and continued to advocate, regardless of the many obstacles. Never in this time period have I stopped to consider my strength or the meaning of the word “mighty.” 

STAY MIGHTY WELL 

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A sensation of strength, joy, and accomplishment washed over me as I realized that I had made it through one of the hardest times of my life with a smile on my face. I had survived the stroke-like symptoms, the inability to eat, and the many other complications. I felt truly mighty.

Stay Mighty Well always. As hard as it seems, try to stay strong at your worst times. Reach out for a hand and ask for help. Remember that there is always a community at Mighty Well right at your fingertips.

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FRIENDS IN THE FIGHT COMMUNITY 

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